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Need a 24-Hour Vet in Windsor? Lauzon Veterinary Hospital is Here for Your Pet!

We know that your pet is part of your family. So if there's an emergency situation, you can rely on Lauzon Veterinary Hospital to take care of this special family member. As your 24-hour vet in Windsor, we are open 7 days a week and 365 days a year. We're always open for any pet emergencies. Our staff is caring and compassionate about all animals and will provide the highest level of veterinary care in the event of an emergency.


If your pet is in distress, please don't hesitate to call. There are some situations, however, where you shouldn't stop to call and just bring your pet to our clinic instead. These emergencies may be the result of an accident or some other sort of significant trauma. Here is when to bring your pet in immediately:

  • Your pet is unconscious and won't wake up
  • Your pet isn't breathing
  • Your pet has been hit by a car
  • Your pet has fallen more than a few feet
  • Your pet may have broken bones
  • Your pet collapses or can't stand up
  • Your pet's abdomen is swollen and hard to the touch
  • Your pet is bleeding from the eyes, nose or mouth
  • Your pet has blood in its urine or feces
  • Your pet has ingested a toxic substance
  • Your pet is having a seizure
  • Your pet is choking

There are many more emergency circumstances. If the situation isn't as serious as those mentioned above, you should still give us a call. After all, it's always better to be safe than sorry.


How to Care for Your Pet During an Emergency

When you call your 24-hour vet in Windsor after an emergency situation, we'll advise you on what to do before coming to our clinic. Please be careful and cautious in handling your pet after an injury or accident as animals often display their pain by pacing, panting and becoming agitated. If your pet is becoming aggressive, remember to approach slowly and say his or her name before asking a friend or family member for help. For cats, it's often helpful to gently place a blanket or towel over their heads in an effort to calm them.


If your pet is bleeding, elevate the area and apply pressure to the wound. If your pet is choking and you're unable to remove the object with your fingers, try to dislodge the blockage by giving a sharp tap to his or her chest. Lastly, if you see your pet ingest something poisonous or suspect that this has happened, call us at 519-948-7727 or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center's 24-hour hotline at 888-426-4435.

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